Dec 092013
 

Teenage drug cartel hit man, who BEHEADED four victims, on his way home to US after serving 3 years in jail

  • Edgar Jimenez Lugo, now 17, beheaded four boys in Mexico in 2010

  • Mexican official said: ‘Being able to say whether he’s been rehabilitated, that would be risky… the crimes he committed were so severe’

  • In 2011, at age 14, Jimenez confessed to killing four young men whose beheaded bodies were found suspended from a bridge

 

Daily Mail / UK
November 26, 2013

 

Edgar Jiminez Lugo: hit man for a Mexican drug cartel has finished his three-year, juvenile-offender term for homicide, kidnapping, drug and weapons possession is now in the USA.

Edgar Jiminez Lugo: hit man for a Mexican drug cartel has finished his three-year, juvenile-offender term for homicide, kidnapping, drug and weapons possession is now in the USA.

 

A 17-year-old U.S. citizen and known hit man for a Mexican drug cartel has finished his three-year, juvenile-offender term for homicide, kidnapping, drug and weapons possession and returned to the United States.

The interior secretary of southern Morelos state, Jorge Messeguer, said Edgar Jimenez Lugo had been released today – though he added it wasn’t clear if the teen had been rehabilitated.

‘Being able to say whether he’s been rehabilitated, that would be risky. I wouldn’t really dare say that, because obviously the crimes he committed were so severe,’ Messeguer said.

 

Freed: Edgar Jimenez Lugo, pictured in 2010 aged 14, has now been freed from a Mexican juvenile offender institution after serving three years for the brutal murders of four boys

Freed: Edgar Jimenez Lugo, pictured in 2010 aged 14, has now been freed from a Mexican juvenile offender institution after serving three years for the brutal murders of four boys

 

Lugo pictured following his arrest with a Mexican soldier. The teenager is now on his way to the U.S. to live with family

Lugo pictured following his arrest with a Mexican soldier. The teenager is now on his way to the U.S. to live with family

 

He said Jimenez flew to San Antonio, Texas on Tuesday where he does not face any charges under U.S. law and is considered a free man. 

The U.S. Embassy said it would not publicly discuss the case due to privacy considerations.

The teenager is believed to have family in Texas and apparently will go to a residential support facility there.

The embassy said in a statement that it was ‘closely coordinating with our Mexican counterparts and appropriate authorities in the United States’ regarding the release.

In 2011, at age 14, Jimenez confessed to killing four young men whose beheaded bodies were found suspended from a bridge.

He was born in San Diego, California, but was raised in Mexico by his grandmother.

Authorities quoted Jimenez as saying he had been forcibly recruited by drug traffickers when he was 11 and confessing to working for the South Pacific drug cartel, led by reputed drug lord Hector Beltran Leyva.

Jimenez was trying to return to the United States when he was caught in 2010.

 

Beheading: A video allegedly shows The Ponchis and his associates preparing to cut the neck of a victim

Beheading: A video allegedly shows The Ponchis and his associates preparing to cut the neck of a victim

 

He and a sister were arrested in Morelos, south of Mexico City, as they tried to board a plane to Tijuana, where they planned to cross the border and reunite with their mother in San Diego.

When he was handed over to federal prosecutors, the boy calmly said in front of cameras that he participated in four killings while drugged and under threat. The bodies were found in the tourist city of Cuernavaca, which is in Morelos.

Jimenez served his three-year sentence, the maximum for juveniles, at a juvenile detention center in Morelos.

The states was formerly controlled by the Beltran Leyva gang, which broke up after alleged leader Arturo Beltran Leyva died in a shootout with Mexican marines in 2009.

Edgar was 14 in August 2010 when he killed the young men — a student, a cook at a university, a gas station attendant and a small-business owner.

Lugo, nicknamed ‘El Ponchis,’ received a three-year term, which was the maximum allowed under law, after he admitted to beheading the four victims in central Mexico.

 

Violent: The military stopped a group of young people in the town of Jiutepec aged between 12 and 23 who were linked to the South Pacific Cartel

Violent: The military stopped a group of young people in the town of Jiutepec aged between 12 and 23 who were linked to the South Pacific Cartel

 

Siblings: Mexican soldiers guard Elizabeth (L) and Oliva Jimenez Lugo (R), aka 'Las Chavelas', sisters of Edgar Jimenez Lugo

Siblings: Mexican soldiers guard Elizabeth (L) and Oliva Jimenez Lugo (R), aka ‘Las Chavelas’, sisters of Edgar Jimenez Lugo

 

At the time of his arrest, he told reporters: ‘I participated in four executions, but I did it drugged and under threat that if I didn’t, they would kill me.’

Lugo became notorious due to his age and online videos that discussed him. There was also a YouTube video of him beating a man with a two-by-four while the man was hanging from the ceiling.

Edgar was convicted in juvenile court in July 2011 of homicide and organized crime charges, and sentenced to three years in custody, the maximum allowed.

Once freed, Edgar will face no clear legal obstacles to crossing into the United States.

‘He can come live here when he turns 18 (in May) without any supervision. The U.S. can’t do anything, and Mexico cannot do anything,’ she said. ‘He wasn’t charged with conspiracy in the U.S.’ said Guadalupe Valencia, a San Diego criminal defense attorney.

Lugo was arrested at a Mexican airport when he and a sister were trying to flee authorities and fly to their mother in San Diego, the outlet reported.

Yolanda Lugo Jimenez was then arrested a few days later on immigration violations and deported in April, the outlet reported noting her whereabouts are now unclear.

Because of his criminal background, his family in Mexico fears his return could also put them at risk.

In recent weeks, his case and pending release has received intense media attention locally.

A book bearing Edgar’s image on the cover was released last month. It included his former street address.

 

Back in 2011: 'El Ponchis' is transported by Mexican police officials with a bag over his head. The 14-year-old boy was on trial for murder, organized crime and drug trafficking

Back in 2011: ‘El Ponchis’ is transported by Mexican police officials with a bag (jacket)  over his head. The 14-year-old boy was on trial for murder, organized crime and drug trafficking

 

Direct Link:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2514101/Edgar-Jimenez-Lugo-BEHEADED-4-victims-freed-heading-US.html

 

 

Jul 192013
 

Suspected drug smuggler has been deported back to Mexico ELEVEN times

Daily Mail / UK
July 17, 2013

Repeat offender: Daniel Jupa-Fino has been arrested in America and deported back to Mexico 11 times

Repeat offender: Daniel Jupa-Fino has been arrested in America and deported back to Mexico 11 times

 

An alleged drug smuggler who was recently busted with more than 220 pounds of marijuana in his car will likely be deported back to Mexico – for the twelfth time.

Authorities in southern Arizona nabbed 21-year-old Daniel Jupa-Fino, of Sonora, Mexico, yesterday as he was driving with the enormous amount of marijuana in his vehicle. After he was taken into custody, officials from the United States Border Patrol Office learned that he already has been arrested and deported 11 times in the last three years.

‘Meanwhile, the Obama administration and Gang of 8 is making plans for green cards and a path to citizenship for 11-20 million illegals,’ Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu says in a statement. ‘We must enforce the law and secure the border prior to any discussion of immigration reform.’

According to Babeu’s office, Jupa-Fino was stopped by sheriff’s deputies as he was driving with a friend, 19-year-old Felipe Gonzalez-Tempura, also of Mexico, outside of Tucson on Tuesday.

Once stopped, the two men tried to evade deputies on foot – Gonzalez-Tempura injured himself while trying to climb over a barbed-wire fence and was arrested on the scene. Jupa-Fino managed to get away.

Weed: Authorities found more than 220 pounds of marijuana in Jupa-Fino's vehicle

Weed: Authorities found more than 220 pounds of marijuana in Jupa-Fino’s vehicle

 

The score: Authorities say the amount of weed found in Jupa-Fino's vehicle has a street value of more than $165,000

The score: Authorities say the amount of weed found in Jupa-Fino’s vehicle has a street value of more than $165,000

 

Several hours after the initial traffic stop, sheriff’s deputies were called to a nearby truck stop to check out a ‘suspicious person’ who’d told nearby residents that he thought authorities were looking for him because he’d run from police during a traffic stop.

Deputies swarmed the truck stop and immediately identified Jupa-Fino as the driver of the vehicle containing the marijuana, which has a street value of more than $165,000, according to the Pinal County Sheriff’s Office.

Jupa-Fino was then brought to a United States Border Patrol Office, where it was revealed that he’d previously been arrested and deported 11 times.

Both men have been charged with possession of marijuana, possession of marijuana for sale and transportation of marijuana.

Smuggler: 19-year-old Felipe Gonzalez-Tempura also is accused of smuggling marijuana into the United States

Smuggler: 19-year-old Felipe Gonzalez-Tempura also is accused of smuggling marijuana into the United States

Direct Link:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2367413/Suspected-drug-smuggler-deported-Mexico-stunning-11-times.html

 

Jan 092012
 

 

Kevin Mitnick’s secret weapon for avoiding jail

CNET
by Elinor Mills

 

Is Kevin Mitnick saying "don't shoot?" No. He's just showing off a bracelet that doubles as a handcuff lock pick.
Is Kevin Mitnick saying “don’t shoot?” No. He’s just showing off a bracelet that doubles as a handcuff lock pick.
(Credit: James Martin/CNET)

Famed hacker Kevin Mitnick has seen enough of the inside of a jail to know he never wants to go back. Now there’s a backup plan in case he ever finds himself arrested again–a bracelet that has a lock-pick tool for handcuffs.

The bracelet looks like a geeky version of a thick woven hippie bracelet. But hidden inside the clasp is the secret tool that slips inside the lock of handcuffs and opens them. They are $17 on Sally’s Cop Shop.

Of course, Mitnick isn’t wearing the accessory with any expectation that he will ever be arrested–he’s a security consultant, speaker and author (his memoir, “Ghost in the Wires,” came out last year and is a fun read). For him the bracelet is mostly a novelty and a bit of an inside joke, much like the version of his business card that doubles as an aluminum lock-pick kit. Plus he likes the “Harry Houdini” aspect of it, having been fascinated with magic since he was a child.

“I show it to cops. It’s a conversational piece,” he said of the bracelet in a recent interview.

But, the item also could genuinely come in handy one day.

“I travel to South America, Mexico, Ecuador, Colombia and we have warnings from the State Department about kidnappings going on, especially in Caracas,” he said. “If I’m kidnapped for some reason it would be great to be able to escape if they handcuff you. That’s why I wear it to South America all the time.”

 

The universal handcuff lock-pick key is hidden inside the clasp.
(Credit: James Martin/CNET)

Originally posted at InSecurity Complex

 

 

 

 

Elinor Mills covers Internet security and privacy. She joined CNET News in 2005 after working as a foreign correspondent for Reuters in Portugal and writing for The Industry Standard, the IDG News Service, and the Associated Press.

 

Direct Link:  http://news.cnet.com/8301-1009_3-57352343-83/kevin-mitnicks-secret-weapon-for-avoiding-jail/

Dec 062011
 

U.S. Agents Launder Mexican Profits of Drug Cartels
The New York Times
Josue Gonzalez/Reuters
December 3, 2011

WASHINGTON — Undercover American narcotics agents have laundered or smuggled millions of dollars in drug proceeds as part of Washington’s expanding role in Mexico’s fight against drug cartels, according to current and former federal law enforcement officials.

The agents, primarily with the Drug Enforcement Administration, have handled shipments of hundreds of thousands of dollars in illegal cash across borders, those officials said, to identify how criminal organizations move their money, where they keep their assets and, most important, who their leaders are.

They said agents had deposited the drug proceeds in accounts designated by traffickers, or in shell accounts set up by agents.

Read the full article at… Direct Link: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/04/world/americas/us-drug-agents-launder-profits-of-mexican-cartels.html

Dec 032011
 

Police Officers Find That Dissent on Drug Laws May Come With a Price
The New York Times
Tyler Hicks
December 2, 2011

PHOENIX — Border Patrol agents pursue smugglers one moment and sit around in boredom the next. It was during one of the lulls that Bryan Gonzalez, a young agent, made some comments to a colleague that cost him his career.

Stationed in Deming, N.M., Mr. Gonzalez was in his green-and-white Border Patrol vehicle just a few feet from the international boundary when he pulled up next to a fellow agent to chat about the frustrations of the job. If marijuana were legalized, Mr. Gonzalez acknowledges saying, the drug-related violence across the border in Mexico would cease. He then brought up an organization called Law Enforcement Against Prohibition that favors ending the war on drugs.

Those remarks, along with others expressing sympathy for illegal immigrants from Mexico, were passed along to the Border Patrol headquarters in Washington. After an investigation, a termination letter arrived that said Mr. Gonzalez held “personal views that were contrary to core characteristics of Border Patrol Agents, which are patriotism, dedication and esprit de corps.”

Read the full article at… Direct Link:  http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/03/us/officers-punished-for-supporting-eased-drug-laws.html?pagewanted=1