Nov 242013
 

From running numbers to larceny to homicide: The mugshots of criminals from over 100 years ago that continue to fascinate

  • Mark Michaelson has collected vintage mugshots for over 20 years and has amassed more than 10,000

  • Last month he auctioned a collection of nearly 1500 mugshots, some dating back from over 100 years ago

  • The collection is also the subject of a documentary film, ‘American Mugshot,’ due out in May

  • Producer Dennis Mohr believes people enjoy the voyeuristic feeling of thinking ‘there but for the grace of God, go I’

Daily Mail / UK
November 24, 2013

 

Last month the Swann Galleries in New York auctioned a massive collection of nearly 1500 mugshots belonging to Michaelson from over 100 years ago

Last month the Swann Galleries in New York auctioned a massive collection of nearly 1500 mugshots belonging to Michaelson from over 100 years ago

 

Originally devised as a law enforcement tool, the mugshot quickly deviated from its intended purpose to help with the identification of criminals because the images captured the imagination of people fascinated with crime and the lives of criminals.

For some, celebrity mugshots hold the most interest, while others prefer those of deteriorating junkies but for New York-based collector and curator Mark Michaelson it is mugshots from yesteryear that capture his imagination.

 

 

Over the past 20 years, Michaelson has assembled an amazing archive of more than 10,000 vintage mugshots of everyday people from all over the country.

 

Shoplifter’s Mugshot

For some, celebrity mugshots hold the most interest, while others prefer those of deteriorating junkies but for New York-based collector and curator Mark Michaelson it is older mugshots that capture his imagination

 

Philly PD Mugshot

Philly PD Mugshot

 

Mug Book: Over the past 20 years, Michaelson has assembled an amazing archive of more than 10,000 vintage mugshots of everyday people from all over the country.

Mug Book: Over the past 20 years, Michaelson has assembled an amazing archive of more than 10,000 vintage mugshots of everyday people from all over the country.

 

Each closeup has a detail that in some way caught his eye, from scars and bandages to crooked teeth and bizarre haircuts.

‘I’m looking for the photos that move me for whatever reason’ he told the New York Daily News in 2012. ‘From things that are terribly funny to things that are terribly tragic.’

Last month the Swann Galleries in New York auctioned a massive collection of nearly 1500 mugshots belonging to Michaelson from over 100 years ago.

The various vintage photographs showed American men and women whose crimes include running numbers to larceny to homicide to ‘incendiary’ labor organizers.

 

Shoplifter

Shoplifter

 

Each closeup has a detail that in some way caught his eye, from scars and bandages to crooked teeth and bizarre haircuts

Another Female Mugshot

Each closeup has a detail that in some way caught his eye, from scars and bandages to crooked teeth and bizarre haircuts.

 

Female Shoplifter

Female Shoplifter

The various vintage photographs showed American men and women whose crimes include running numbers to larceny to homicide to ‘incendiary’ labor organizers.

Sold for $10,000, the images are an eclectic selection of crimes and criminals spanning the United Sates and Canada.

 

B/M Mugshot

B/M Mugshot

 

The portraits depict a range of socioeconomic types spanning the 1900s-1920s, from the bruised and handsome con man to the dapper, but scary hardened criminal.

Interestingly, women figured prominently, as did a host of different ethnic groups. While some criminals face the camera with aplomb and guile, the posture of those arrested for petty crimes conveys more shame and fear.

Michaelson is also the subject of a forthcoming documentary film, ‘American Mugshot,’ which is due to be released in May.

 

The portraits depict a range of socioeconomic types spanning the 1900s-1920s, from the bruised and handsome con man to the dapper, but scary hardened criminal.

The portraits depict a range of socioeconomic types spanning the 1900s-1920s, from the bruised and handsome con man to the dapper, but scary hardened criminal.

 

Interestingly, women figured prominently, as did a host of ethnic figures. While some face the camera with aplomb and guile, the posture of those arrested for petty crimes conveys shame and fear.

Interestingly, women figured prominently, as did a host of ethnic figures. While some face the camera with aplomb and guile, the posture of those arrested for petty crimes conveys shame and fear.

 

Producer Dennis Mohr first got the idea for the film when he saw a copy of The Slammer, a weekly Southern tabloid that publishes pages upon pages of mugshots, in a supermarket.

‘I think it’s just human nature to be attracted to faces,’ he told The Daily News.

‘People have always been fascinated with crime. They want to be involved in something that they cannot touch or do not want to be responsible for.’

Mohr believes that people enjoy the voyeuristic feeling of looking at something both dangerous and close to home.

‘At the end of the day, this could happen to any of us,’ he said. ‘It’s kind of like, “There but for the grace of God, go I.”‘

 

Collector Mark Michaelson is the subject of the forthcoming documentary film, 'American Mugshot,' which is due to be released in May.

Collector Mark Michaelson is the subject of the forthcoming documentary film, ‘American Mugshot,’ which is due to be released in May.

 

 

Direct Link:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2513018/From-running-numbers-larceny-homicide-The-mugshots-criminals-100-years-ago-continue-fascinate.html

 

 

Oct 272013
 

Rio Hondo police officer arrested in tool theft

 

Valley Morning Star News
by EMMA PEREZ-TREVIÑO
October 4, 2013

 

 

Officer Ernesto Yañez,  was identified as a suspect in the Sept. 27 burglary of tools from a construction

Officer Ernesto Yañez, was identified as a suspect in the Sept. 27 burglary of tools from a construction

 

RIO HONDO  (TX) —

A police officer was arrested for stealing tools after a botched burglary in which he dropped a police pager at the crime scene, the sheriff said Friday.

Officer Ernesto Yañez, 26, was identified as a suspect in the Sept. 27 burglary of tools from a construction site at a residence near Rio Hondo, Cameron County Sheriff Omar Lucio said Friday.

Yañez resigned from the police department on Oct. 1, and was taken into custody Friday in Houston, Lucio said. Yañez was expected to be returned to Cameron County.

A second suspect, 22-year-old Manuel Manzanares, also was charged in connection with the burglary, authorities said.

Both men are believed to reside in the Rio Grande Valley.

“Anytime that a law enforcement officer is involved in criminal activity, it is a black eye to law enforcement,” Lucio said. “Like everything else, you have bad attorneys, bad doctors, bad teachers; people we feel are pillars of the community, bankers and what have you.

“We wish that were not the case because it is a very honorable profession. There are a lot of outstanding officers in the cities and counties and throughout the state and the United States, but you will always find some bad apples,” the sheriff added.

Lucio said that Yañez had tried to give himself a cover story after he realized he had lost his pager.

 The sheriff said Yañez called the homeowner at about 2 a.m. on Sept. 28. When the homeowner did not answer the telephone, Yañez left a message that he had been patrolling the area, had seen the gate to the property open and had walked inside to check, Lucio said.

“Apparently he was trying to cover his tracks,” Lucio said.

Subsequently, the Sheriff’s Department was called to the Rio Hondo Police Department, Lucio said, because Yañez had said that he had arrested Manzanares, a suspect who allegedly committed the burglary.

Manzanares was arrested, with bond set at $5,000.

Manzanares later accused Yañez, saying that he had been riding with Yañez in the police car, and that both had been involved in the burglary.

Yañez, after he resigned, went to Houston. An arrest warrant was issued for him.

The tools belonged to Gene Diaz, a retired U.S. Marshal, who was doing the construction work for the Glatz family. Diaz noticed the gate to the property open when he arrived for work, and realized that some of the tools had been taken, the sheriff said.

Diaz found the pager.

Lucio said the tools that had been taken from the property in the police unit had been recovered.

Rio Hondo Police Chief Weldon Matlock declined comment except to say Yañez had not been a full-time police officer and had resigned.

The Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education, the peace-officer licensing agency, said Friday that Yañez had been a police officer in Port Isabel from 2009 through the spring of 2012.

Police Chief Wally Gonzalez was not available to comment on why Yañez left the police force last year.

Yañez then held a dual commission as a reserve deputy Cameron County constable in 2012, which overlapped for a few months with service as a reserve officer in Rio Hondo.

Public records show that Manzanares was charged in Cameron County with evading arrest and possession of marijuana in October 2009. The marijuana charge was dismissed and he was given deferred adjudication on the evading arrest charge after pleading guilty in February 2010. His 16-month sentence was probated, but his probation was revoked and he was to serve 90 days in jail in 2011, the public record shows.

 

Direct Link:  http://www.valleymorningstar.com/news/local_news/article_a6faf87e-2d7a-11e3-b59b-001a4bcf6878.html

 

 

Sep 022013
 

Hacker Pleads Guilty to Selling FBI Access to U.S. Supercomputers

WIRED
by David Kravets
August 27, 2013

 

Cray XT4 supercomputer cluster (Franklin) has 9,660 compute nodes. Each has quad-core AMD processors running at 2.3 GHz. Franklin has 38,640 processor cores, with 8 GB of memory per node and a total 350 TB of usable disk space. (Photo: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Roy Kaltschmidt/Flickr)

Cray XT4 supercomputer cluster (Franklin) has 9,660 compute nodes. Each has quad-core AMD processors running at 2.3 GHz. Franklin has 38,640 processor cores, with 8 GB of memory per node and a total 350 TB of usable disk space. (Photo: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Roy Kaltschmidt/Flickr)

 

A 24-year-old Pennsylvania hacker pleaded guilty today to accusations he tried to sell access to Energy Department supercomputers he unlawfully accessed.

The defendant, who remains free pending a November sentencing date, faces as much as 18 months behind bars under a plea deal (.pdf) with Massachusetts federal authorities.

Among other exploits, Andrew James Miller pleaded guilty to propositioning an undercover Federal Bureau of Investigation agent during an online chat to pay him $50,000 for “root” access to the supercomputers at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab California.

Using the handle “Green,” he pasted during the chat that he had proof of access, the government said in an indictment. The research center, which houses some of the world’s most powerful computers, offers high-end computing power for Energy Department-approved projects.

The defendant, a member of the hacking group Underground Intelligence Agency, was arrested and indicted (.pdf) in June. A fellow member of the group, Robert Burns, who went by the handle “Intel,” assisted authorities with the prosecution, court documents show.

Miller gained access to the supercomputers via hacking into a Japanese university that had connections to those computers, the government said. Miller told FBI agents that he also had access to the supercomputers via Harvard University and the University of California at Davis.

The feds never paid him the $50,000, according to court records. (.pdf)

According to court documents, the defendant bragged to FBI agents online that he had broken into the corporate servers of American Express, Yahoo, Google, Adobe, WordPress and other companies and universities.

The authorities said they paid him $1,000, via Western Union, for access to the entire corporate network of RNKTel, a Massachusetts-based telco.

“According to RNKTel, with that administrator-level access, a bad actor could not only have accessed RNKTel’s confidential business records but could also have altered customer accounts to obtain, for free, the telecommunication services that RNKTel sells to its customers,” prosecutors said.

For $1,200, the FBI bought from Miller a database of thousands of log-in credentials of the ISP Layered Tech of Texas. Miller also sold the FBI — for $1,000 — access to the domain of the Domino’s Pizza chain, according to court records.

 

Direct Link: http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2013/08/hacker-super-computer-access/

Dec 092011
 

JKB UPDATE>>  ATTRITION’s ARTICLE: AssHats Joe Black

Joseph K. Black

Social Media Experiment Gone Horribly Wrong

Mon Feb 28 04:46:25 CST 2011

 

Update: On October 31, 2011, Joseph K. Black was arrested by Nebraska police officers after a 35 minute car chase spanning four counties. When the chase ended, “troopers said Black got out of the car holding a small dog and pointed his finger at officers making shooting noises.” This ended with Black getting tased by police for being uncooperative. We don’t want to say “told you so”, but…

KETV: Chase Takes Police From Omaha To Lincoln
KMTV: Police Chase Man In 4-County High-Speed Pursuit
WOWT: Police Apprehend Suspect in Four County Chase
Omaha man caught after early morning pursuit


Given the inane amount of joseph black babble to come from Joseph K. Black via Facebook and Twitter in late January of 2011, we’ll spare everyone a lot of the gory details and just post a few short examples of why Black will not only never obtain his dream job of National Cybersecurity Advisor, but will likely end up working the counter at a Runza near you some time in the near future, provided he doesn’t end up in prison.

Simply put, Black has designs on being appointed “National Cybersecurity Advisor” by the Obama administration. While that in itself may be an admirable goal, Black seems to think that self-promotion, being top 10 on search results and outlandish claims through social media outlets will help his cause more than, say, actual experience and contributions to the security industry (“cyber” or otherwise). Moving into February, his big thing became some fictional “megacommunity” (“Google it!” he says) with imaginary ties to every government agency, big service provider and anything else that he fancies.

 

With his inability to use Twitter and Facebook correctly, posting everything three or four times, he betrays the notion that he is an expert at anything. Because really, Twitter is hard to figure out. According to Black, he is the Ben Roethlisberger of Cybersecurity, the Governor of Cyberspace, the King of Cyberspace, the John Wayne of Cyberspace, the Michael Jordan of Cybersecurity, the Smokey the Bear of Cybersecurity, the Captain of the Cool Kids and a Cybersecurity ROCKSTAR! We could cite dozens of examples of his general idiocy here, but a short few should paint a clear picture of the level of e-tard we’re dealing with:

   
   

The @Gregory_D_Evans Twitter account summed it all up very nicely in one tweet:

It should be noted that before Black “went full retard” as mentioned above, Lyger did try to personally and privately contact Black twice via email to open a dialogue. Neither email was answered:

Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2011 10:56:38 -0600 (CST)
From: lyger (lyger@attrition.org)
To: j.black@blackbergsecurity.us
Subject: Black & Berg intent

Hi Joe,

I've noticed over the past few days that you've mentioned Black & Berg
over a few different social media outlets (most noticeably Twitter and
Facebook). Some of the posts have been somewhat curious to say the least:



http://twitter.com/JosephKBlack/statuses/29056293369020416

Since you apparently have various security industry certifications, I'm
curious about your reasoning behind some of the comments I (as well
as other professionals in the security industry) have seen.  This isn't
intended to be a criticism, just reaching out to see if your messages are
intended to be serious, a marketing ploy, a mixture of both, or something
else we haven't quite figured out yet.

 

Whether he’s just overzealous, delusional, a net-kook, or a simple troll, we’re done with him. Desperate and irrelevant, Black has had his 15 minutes of notoriety (not “fame”, as he probably thinks) and like all good trolls, his time too has passed. He isn’t relevant enough to include on Errata: Charlatan, so he ended up here, on Postal: Asshats.

*PLONK* .. we’ll leave you with this mess:

   
   
   
   
   

 

————-

Direct Link: http://attrition.org/postal/asshats/joe_black/

Nov 182011
 

Police: Pimp arrested for trafficking 14-year-old girl

Nov 17, 2011 

By Cara Liu

 

PHOENIX (KPHO) -

A Valley man has been arrested on child prostitution charges. 

Story Segment – Video

Al O’Neal, 32, was arrested Tuesday. Police say he recruited a 14-year-old girl and forced her to turn tricks along 27th Avenue.  An ad was also placed on backpage.com, said police.

Court records show O’Neal instructed the girl to charge $100 for sex and bring in a minimum of $200 a night.

Tiffany Burt, 28, was also arrested.  Police say she drove the girl to Las Vegas for prostitution calls.

Police say a second 15-year-old victim was also rescued.  They say both girls were runaways.

Shortly before his arrest, O’Neal had to be hospitalized after “the beating of a lifetime,” said investigators.  He would not say what happened, but his eye was busted and he needed casts on his arm and leg, they said.

 

Direct Link: http://www.kpho.com/story/16061039/police-pimp-arrested-for-trafficking-14-year-old-girl?Call=Email&Format=Text