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Met them online? Get them checked out.

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It’s 2015. People are meeting online and getting married. However, online dating is not always a success story. There have been many online relationships which have started and ended with deception. An easy way to find out if someone you are involved with online is “for real” is to have a licensed private investigator run a background check on them. There are many online databases that offer free or cheap background checks, however the data is usually wrong, incomplete, is for a different person, and/or just not available to them. A comprehensive background check includes many things including criminal history in different states.

At G.E. Investigations, we are able to get you the facts and give you peace of mind. If you are in a serious relationship, choose the path of knowledge and find out who you are really talking to.

Call us Toll Free (866) 347-7948 or Email Us

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Listen to us live on Contract for Love today!

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Description: Lori Jae and George E., owner of GE Investigations, want you to call in: 1-866-472-5795 and tell us what drives you crazy in your relationship. We want to hear from you…Let’s rant! Be anonymous, just let us hear from you!!! Say anything you need to say but let’s rant about our relationships or just share with us your pet peeves! Talk to us at 1-866-472-5795 would you have an affair? Would you want a divorce? Do you have a question about how to hire a private eye? How can a private detective help you! We are here for you on “contract for love” with Lori Jae and George E.

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Tune in live on TODAY at 12 Noon Pacific Time on Voice America 7th Wave.

You can share your story during the show by calling in LIVE on air:

Toll Free: 1-866-472-5795 / International: 001-480-398-1405

Listen online and via app here.

You can also get info on the show from earlier this month here.

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NYE: The Gritty Side of Marriage on Contract For Love with Lori Jae (Radio)

The president of GE Investigations, LLC will return as the guest on Contract For Love with Lori Jae. The topic of discussion with be more about the gritty side of marriage, a follow up to the show from December 10th.
GE RADIO Dec 31

Tune in live on Wednesday December  31 (New Year’s Eve) at 12 Noon Pacific Time on Voice America 7th Wave.

You can share your story during the show by calling in LIVE on air:

Toll Free: 1-866-472-5795 / International: 001-480-398-1405

Listen online and via app here.

You can also get info on the show from earlier this month here.

Follow GE Investigations…

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REMEMBER, REMEMBER The 5th of November… On November 5, 1605, Guy was foiled as he plotted to destroy the Houses of Parliament during the state opening and kill all inside it, including the King!

On November 5, 1605, Guy was foiled as he plotted to destroy the Houses of Parliament during the state opening and kill all inside it, including the King

 

Mirror / UK
by Steve Myall
November 5, 2014

 

 

Guido "Guy" Fawkes
Guido “Guy” Fawkes

 

He’s world famous thanks to his distinctive moustached face which has been adopted as a mask by anti capitalists but Guy Fawkes is best known for failing to blow up Westminster Palace.

On November 5, 1605, Guy was foiled as he plotted to destroy the Houses of Parliament during state opening and kill all inside it including the King in what became known as the Gunpowder Plot.

But aside from that what do we know about the conspirator who was just 35 when he died.

He was born on April 13th 1570 in Stonegate in York, and was educated at St. Peter’s School in York, preferring to be called Guido Fawkes.

As a boy he lived near York with his father Edward and his mother Edith.

 

 The Gunpowder Plot conspirators (pic; Getty)
The Gunpowder Plot conspirators (pic; Getty)

 

His father was a Protestant and worked as a solicitor for the religious court of the church however in 1579 he died and three years later his mother remarried a man called Denis Bainbridge, a Catholic and so the young Guy converted.

Converting to Catholicism which in those days was a big deal as the ruling religion was led by Church of England which would not tolerate Roman Catholicism.

It was incredibly hard to worship so devotees were driven underground and it was from that oppression the plot sprung.

There have been rumours that Guy met and married Maria Pulleyn in 1590 – but there are no parish records to show this which has led it being open to dispute.

 

 A lantern belonging to Guy Fawkes Relic: A lantern belonging to Guy Fawkes (pic: Getty)
Relic: A lantern belonging to Guy Fawkes (pic: Getty)

 

So fervent were Guy’s religious beliefs that he first choose to leave Protestant England and enlist in the Spanish army in Holland in the Eighty Years War.

There he won a reputation for great courage and cool determination and this is where he gained experience with explosives, and also where he decided to call himself Guido, probably because it sounded Spanish.

In 1604 at Ostend, Guy met another Englishman called Thomas Winter, who had also been in Spain trying to drum up support for English Catholics.

As the two travelled back to London Thomas told Guy that he and his friends including Yorkshiremen John and Christopher Wright, from Welwick, and Robert Catesby, were going to take action but needed the help of a military man who would not be recognised by the authorities.

 

 Guy Fawkes Caught: The arrest of Guy Fawkes in the cellars of Parliament (pic: REX)
Guy Fawkes
Caught: The arrest of Guy Fawkes in the cellars of Parliament (pic: REX)

 

Guy was not the mastermind behind the plot despite his subsequent fame – that was Warwickshire born Robert Catesby, the son of a persecuted Roman Catholic.

Catesby, a wealthy man, knew most of his co-conspirators through a network of friendships with various Roman Catholic families.

The exception was Guy, who he likely to have met when he was briefly employed as a footman by Anthony Browne, 2nd Lord Montague, a family which Catesby’s sister had married into.

October 18, 1605 is a crucial date with regards to the conspiracy as it is when the conspirators discussed how Catholic peers might be spared from the planned explosion.

 

 Execution of Guy Fawkes Crime and punishment: The execution of Guy Fawkes and associates (pic: Getty)
Crime and punishment: The execution of Guy Fawkes and associates (pic: Getty)

 

This led to the famed ‘Monteagle Letter’ written on October 26 to catholic MP William Parker, the 4th Baron Monteagle warning him not to come near Westminster.

In order to get close enough to their targets a cellar below the Houses of Parliament was rented by the members of the plot which was filled with 36 barrels of gunpowder.

There was enough to completely destroy the building and damage buildings within a one mile radius of it.

The plot was undone when the anonymous letter was sent to the Baron of Monteagle, warning him not to go to the House of Lords was made public.

 

Famed: Guy Fawkes (pic: Getty)
Famed: Guy Fawkes (pic: Getty)

 

This led to a search of Westminster Palace being ordered and in the early hours of November 5, Guy was discovered guarding the explosives.

Initially he pretended to be a servant and said the wood belonged to his master Thomas Percy but when this was reported to the King, and the fact that Percy was a Catholic, the King ordered a second search, the gunpowder was found and Guy arrested.

During his involvement in the Gunpowder Plot, Fawkes called himself John Johnson and when he was arrested and asked to give his name, this is the name he gave.

Shortly after being found early in the morning of November 5, the Privy Council met in the King’s bedchamber, and Fawkes was brought in under guard and asked explain why he wanted to kill him and blow up Parliament.

 

 

 London Houses of Parliament Tradition: The Yeoman of the Guard prepares to carry out a search of the vaults below Westminster (Pic: REX)
London Houses of Parliament
Tradition: The Yeoman of the Guard prepares to carry out a search of the vaults below Westminster (Pic: REX)

 

He answered that he regarded the King as a disease since he had been excommunicated by the Pope.

Asked why he he needed such a huge quantity of gunpowder, he apparently said: “To blow you Scotch beggars back to your own native mountains!”

Guy was sent to the Tower of London King James indicated in a letter of 6 November that “The gentler tortours are to be first used unto him, and so by degrees proceeding to the worst, and so God speed your goode worke”

And over the next four days, he was questioned and tortured on the “rack” and eventually confessed and gave the names of his conspirators.

His signature on the written confession after torture, which is still held by the National Archives, was very faint and weak, and another taken a few days later was much bolder indicating how weakened he must have been by torture.

 

 

 Bonfire societies parade through the streets during the Bonfire Night celebrations on November 5, 2013 in Lewes, Sussex in England Heritage: Bonfire Night celebrations in Lewes (pic: Getty)
Bonfire societies parade through the streets during the Bonfire Night celebrations on November 5, 2013 in Lewes, Sussex in England
Heritage: Bonfire Night celebrations in Lewes (pic: Getty)

 

Fawkes and others involved were tried on January 31st 1606 and then hung, drawn and quartered in the Old Palace Yard in Westminster.

The Attorney General Sir Edward Coke told the court that each of the condemned would be drawn backwards to his death, by a horse, his head near the ground.

They were to be “put to death halfway between heaven and earth as unworthy of both”.

Their genitals would be cut off and burnt before their eyes, and their bowels and hearts removed.

They would then be decapitated, and the dismembered parts of their bodies displayed so that they might become “prey for the fowls of the air”.

 

 

November 5th Bonfire
November 5th Bonfire

 

But Guy had the last laugh as immediately before his execution on January 31, he jumped from the scaffold where he was to be hanged and broke his neck, thus avoiding the agony of the mutilation.

He also did not have his body parts distributed to “the four corners of the kingdom”, to be displayed as a warning to other would-be traitors.

 

Despite being involved in what is basically a terrorist plot, Guy Fawkes was named the 30th Greatest Briton in a poll conducted by the BBC in 2002.

 

Today the word “guy” is used to refer to a man but originally it was a term for an “ugly, repulsive person” in reference to Fawkes.

Straw effigies made of Guy Fawkes and thrown onto bonfires to remember the Gunpowder Plot were also known as “guys” and over time the meaning has blurred.

Following the thwarting of the plot Londoners were encouraged to celebrate the King’s escape from assassination by lighting bonfires and this tradition continues today.  

 

Direct Link:  http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/bonfire-night-guy-fawkes-story-4570317

Heartbleed: routers and phones also at risk, says security expert

Heartbleed: routers and phones also at risk, says security expert

Manufacturers must patch routers, video conferencing software and desktop phones, as scale of software vulnerability continues to grow

 

The Guardian
by Alex Hern
April 14, 2014

 

The recently uncovered "Heartbleed" bug exposes data to hackers. (Photograph: Pawel Kopzynski / Reuters)
The recently uncovered “Heartbleed” bug exposes data to hackers. (Photograph: Pawel Kopzynski / Reuters)

 

Heartbleed, the software vulnerability in hundreds of thousands of web servers which laid their contents open to attackers, also affects consumer devices, security experts have warned.

Hardware including smartphones, routers and cable boxes are all potentially affected, posing the risk of anything from data theft to attackers seizing control of the vulnerable device.

“Network-connected devices often run a basic web server to let an administrator access online control panels,” says Philip Lieberman, president of security firm Lieberman Software. “In many cases, these servers are secured using OpenSSL and their software will need updating.

“However, this is unlikely to be a priority. The manufacturers of these devices will not release patches for the vast majority of their devices, and consumers will patch an insignificant number of devices.”

Some manufacturers have confirmed that their devices are not affected. Belkin says that its routers, as well as those of its Linksys subsidiary, are safe: one range does use OpenSSL, the software which contains the Heartbleed vulnerability, but uses a version which predates the flaw.

But others are not so lucky. Networking giant Cisco has confirmed that a number of its products are vulnerable, including desktop phones, video conferencing hardware and VPN software. It is investigating a further 83 products for potential vulnerabilities.

Neither Netgear nor BT returned requests for comment, and have not spoken publicly about whether or not their devices are vulnerable.

For affected devices, operators are slowly releasing patches, which must be downloaded and installed. But many users will not apply the updates, warns Lieberman.

“The list of compromised devices is huge,” he says. “Most of the devices are not going to be patched because their users do not know how to do it since they bought a router or firewall, not OpenSSL (as far as they are concerned).

“Many of the devices are from manufacturers that are no longer supporting the previously shipped devices as a matter of policy and business model,” he adds. “What do you expect in the way of support when you buy a device or embedded system for less than $100 and the company is making $10.00?”

As with affected websites, users should not change passwords until they are sure the vulnerability has been fixed. The best way to be certain is to wait for the affected company to specifically say it is time to change passwords: examples of companies who have done so include Tumblr, Flickr, IFTTT and Dogecoin service DogeAPI.

 

SSL keys stolen

One potential avenue of hope was blocked off on Friday, when online services company CloudFlare confirmed that four people had successfully stolen SSL certificates from an affected server.

SSL is the basis of security online, and is the protocol that leads to browsers displaying a padlock icon to show that a given website is secure. One of the attacks that the Heartbleed vulnerability allows is theft of the private key for SSL, allowing an attacker to decrypt intercepted messages or impersonate the site.

Cloudflare had previously written that “we have reason to believe… that it may in fact be impossible” to steal the keys from their servers, in contrast to claims made by the researchers who uncovered the flaw. But the company issued a challenge to the outside world to prove them wrong, and four separate researchers managed to steal the information over the next 48 hours.

The result of the challenge underscores that it’s not enough for a site vulnerable to Heartbleed to fix the server: it also needs to treat the SSL key as stolen, and issue a new one. Cloudflare described the possibility of a stolen key as “the disaster scenario, requiring virtually every service to reissue and revoke its SSL certificates. Note that simply reissuing certificates is not enough, you must revoke them as well.”

Since the news of Heartbleed broke on April 6, more than 10,000 sites have revoked and re-issued their certificates, giving some idea of the scale of the problem.

 

* RELATED:

Heartbleed: what you need to know

 

Direct Link:  http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/apr/14/heartbleed-routers-phones-at-risk-security-expert