REAL LASER GUN!…. NES Zapper Laser packs a punch

NES Zapper Laser packs a punch

 

GizMag
By Adam Williams
September 24, 2012

 

A hacker has retrofitted a classic NES Zapper with a powerful laser, resulting in a gun that is anything but a toy

 

A full trigger pull provides a momentary pulse, while a partial trigger will enable a longer burn time

 

The basic components used to make the NES Zapper Laser included batteries, a 445 nm diode, lens, key switch and heat-sink

Remember the classic NES Zapper, as used in games like Duck Hunt? Well, an intrepid tinkerer at North Street Labs hacker space in Portsmouth, Virginia, has taken that same harmless toy and retrofitted it with a powerful laser.

 

The tools used to make the NES Zapper Laser were non-specialist items such as soldering irons and screwdrivers

 

There’s a step-by-step guide available for building your own NES Zapper Laser, but this is definitely not a project for novices to tackle

 

A full trigger pull provides a momentary pulse, while a partial trigger will enable a longer burn time

 

While not quite deadly enough to take out a real life mallard, you wouldn’t want to point the NES Zapper Laser toward a TV either, as it’s capable of doing considerable damage to whatever it shoots.

 

The basic components used to make the NES Zapper Laser included batteries, a 445 nm diode, lens, key switch and heat-sink

 

The somewhat complicated retrofitting process involved removing most of the NES Zapper’s original internal electronics to make room for the dangerous laser tech.

The tools used to make the NES Zapper Laser were non-specialist items such as soldering irons and screwdrivers

 

The NES Zapper Laser is a gun that’s anything but a toy

 

However, the switch and trigger mechanism were kept in place as, impressively, Nintendo engineered the electric momentary switch inside the gun to such a high degree that it’s capable of handling the high levels of current necessary for a real laser gun.

The tools used to make the NES Zapper Laser were non-specialist items such as soldering irons and screwdrivers

 

There’s a step-by-step guide available for building your own NES Zapper Laser, but this is…

The NES Zapper Laser is set up so that a full trigger pull provides a momentary pulse, while a partial pull produces a longer burn time. Sensibly, the gun’s creator Justin integrated a key-operated safety switch into the gun’s butt to prevent unauthorized usage, as in the wrong hands the NES Zapper Laser could easily blind someone.

The basic components used to make the NES Zapper Laser included batteries, a 445 nm diode, lens, key switch and heat-sink

 

A full trigger pull provides a momentary pulse, while a partial trigger will enable a longer burn time

 

There’s a step-by-step guide available for building your own NES Zapper Laser, but this is definitely not a project for novices to tackle

The basic components used to make the NES Zapper Laser included batteries, a 445 nm diode, lens, key switch and heat-sink. There’s a step-by-step guide to building your own NES Zapper Laser via the source link below, but this is definitely not a project for the novice and proper safety gear is essential.

A full trigger pull provides a momentary pulse, while a partial trigger will enable a longer burn time


Check out the video below to see the Nintendo Zapper Laser in action.

Source: North Street Labs via Hack A Day

 

Direct Link:  http://www.gizmag.com/nes-zapper-laser/24256/

“REAL LIFE” Blue Thunder…. A third of US public fears police use of drones

A third of US public fears police use of drones

More than a third of Americans worry their privacy will suffer if drones like those used to spy on U.S. enemies overseas become the latest police tool for tracking suspected criminals at home, according to an Associated Press-National Constitution Center poll.

PHYS ORG
by Joan Lowy
September 27, 2012

Congress has directed the Federal Aviation Administration to come up with safety regulations that will clear the way for routine domestic use of unmanned aircraft within the next three years.

 


The government is under pressure from a wide range of interests to open U.S. skies to drones.

Oil companies want them to monitor pipelines. Environmentalists want them to count sea lions on remote islands. Farmers want them to fly over crops with sensors that can detect which fields are wet and which need watering. They’re already being used to help fight forest fires. And the list goes on.

Manufacturers are also keen to cash in on what they expect to be a burgeoning new drone market. Government and commercial drone-related expenditures are forecast to total $89 billion worldwide over the next decade.

 


On the leading edge of that new market are state and local police departments, who say that in many cases drones are cheaper, more practical and more effective than manned aircraft. Most of them would be small drones, generally weighing less than 55 pounds (25 kilograms). They could be used, for example, to search for missing children or to scout a location ahead of a police raid.

But privacy advocates caution that drones equipped with powerful cameras, including the latest infrared cameras that can “see” through walls, listening devices and other information-gathering technology raise the specter of a surveillance society in which the activities of ordinary citizens are monitored and recorded by the authorities.

Nearly half the public, 44 percent, supports allowing police forces inside the U.S. to use drones to assist police work, but a significant minority—36 percent—say they “strongly oppose” or “somewhat oppose” police use of drones, according to a survey last month.

When asked if they were concerned that police departments’ use of drones for surveillance might cause them to lose privacy, 35 percent of respondents said they were “extremely concerned” or “very concerned.” An almost identical share, 36 percent, said they were “not too concerned” or “not concerned at all.”

Twenty-four percent fell in the middle, saying they were “somewhat concerned” about a potential loss of personal privacy.

David Eisner, president and chief executive of the constitution center in Philadelphia, said he was surprised by the level of support for police use of drones.

“I had assumed that the idea that American police would be using the same technology that our military is using in Afghanistan would garner an almost hysterical response,” Eisner said. Support for drone use “shows that people are feeling less physically secure than they’d like to because they are willing to accept fairly extreme police action to improve that security.”

There was a gender gap in the poll, with men were more concerned about a loss of privacy if police start using drones than women—40 percent to 30 percent. There was an even wider gap between white and black respondents, with 48 percent of blacks strongly concerned about a loss of privacy compared to 32 percent of whites.

Responding to public concern, a drone industry trade group and the International Association of Police Chiefs have separately released voluntary guidelines for drone use in recent months.

“A lot of the public doesn’t understand how the technology is being used,” said Gretchen West, vice president of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International. “Law enforcement use (drones) to do the same thing they’ve used manned aircraft for years, it’s just that (drones) are more affordable and usually a more efficient option.”

The National Constitution Center is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that operates a Philadelphia museum and other educational programs about the Constitution.

The AP-NCC Poll was conducted by GfK Roper Public Affairs & Corporate Communications from Aug. 16-20, using landline and cellphone interviews with 1,006 randomly chosen adults. The margin of sampling error was plus or minus 3.9 percentage points.

 

US banks hit by more than a week of powerful cyberattacks; speculation swirls over culprits

US banks hit by more than a week of powerful cyberattacks; speculation swirls over culprits

The Wall Street Journal
By Associated Press
September 28, 2012

 

 

 

 

U.S. banks have been buffeted by more than a week of powerful cyberattacks, but the mystery surrounding their perpetrators lingers.

One expert said Friday that he was suspicious of claims of responsibility purportedly made by Islamists angry at an anti-Muslim movie made in the United States, explaining that the widely-circulated Internet postings might have been an attempt to deflect attention from the true culprit.

“In the intelligence world, we call that a ‘false flag,’” said Mike Smith, whose Web security company Akamai has helped analyze some of the attacks.

The postings, published to the Web earlier this month, suggested that an obscure Islamist group had taken revenge on American financial institutions for the “Innocence of Muslims,” a low-budget U.S. film that ridiculed Muhammad, revered by Muslims as the last of God’s prophets.

Since then at least half a dozen banks — including the Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, and Citigroup — have witnessed traffic surges and disruptions. Not all have confirmed they were the victims of an online onslaught, but such surges are a hallmark of denial-of-service attacks, which work by drowning target websites with streams of junk data.

Such attacks are fairly common and generally don’t compromise sensitive data or do any lasting damage. Still, they can be a huge headache for companies that rely on their websites to interact with customers.

Most say the recent spate of attacks has been unusually powerful. PNC bank, which was hit on Thursday, has never seen such a strong surge in traffic, spokesman Fred Solomon said in a telephone interview. Smith said he estimated the flow of data at 60 to 65 gigabits per second.

Smith said the profile and power of the attack made it an unlikely fit for the religious youth that the Internet postings called upon to join in the anti-U.S. campaign. He explained that politically-motivated hackers — often called hacktivists — usually flood the Web with appeals for support and post links to software that can turn followers’ personal computers into crude cyberweapons.

Twitter and online chat rooms then explode with activity, as casual supporters pile in to coordinate attacks.

“You’re not seeing that with this particular set of attacks,” Smith said. “At the same time … the attack traffic is fairly homogeneous. It’s not this wide cornucopia of attacks that’s coming at you that you see with a hacktivist attack.”

So who is behind the campaign?

Cybercriminals often use denial-of-service attacks to shake down smaller websites, but major U.S. banks make unlikely targets for a protection racket.

Could a state actor be at play? U.S. Senator Joe Lieberman, without offering any proof, said he believed the assaults were carried out by Iran in retaliation for tightened economic sanctions imposed by the United States and its allies.

Smith demurred when asked who could be behind the campaign, although he said there were “only a handful of groups out there that have the technical ability or incentive” to carry it out.

In any case, the online attacks appeared to be easing. Solomon, the PNC bank spokesman, said while traffic remained heavy Friday the flow was gradually returning to normal.

Doug Johnson, with the American Bankers Association, echoed that assessment.

“I believe it’s tapering off,” he said.

 

Direct Link:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/us-banks-hit-by-more-than-a-week-of-powerful-cyberattacks-speculation-swirls-over-culprits/2012/09/28/f18eb2a6-09a2-11e2-9eea-333857f6a7bd_story.html

 

To Unlock A Full Price AT&T iPhone 5, Just Restore It In iTunes

To Unlock A Full Price AT&T iPhone 5, Just Restore It In iTunes

GIZMODO
by Romain Dillet
September 26, 2012

 

If you have bought an AT&T iPhone 5 without a contract over the past few days, chances are that you want to unlock it to use it on another carrier. The traditional process involves filling out an online form on AT&T’s website, sending a fax (yes, a fax) to AT&T, waiting 5 to 7 days and restoring your phone. It turns out that it is much easier than that: just restore the phone in iTunes and it will be unlocked.

We have confirmed the process with AT&T’s technical support and successfully tried it with a T-Mobile SIM card. After restoring the device in iTunes, the user is prompted with the usual unlocking message: “Congratulations, your iPhone has been unlocked.”

This message wasn’t enough for me though. I need more proof that I could use the iPhone on every carrier and abroad.

After receiving the notification my new iPhone was unlocked, I cut a micro-SIM card into the shape of a nano-SIM by using the AT&T SIM card that was already in the iPhone 5 as a guide. The most difficult part was to make it narrower so that you can close the tiny nano-SIM tray, though some have reported that this step may be optional.

In a couple of seconds, the iPhone was able to pick up the T-Mobile network, and calls and EDGE data connectvity worked as expected. Some reports, including on AT&T forum, confirm this.

When you buy an iPhone, the device is added to Apple’s big iPhone database thanks to the IMEI, which is used as a unique identifier. Full price and subsidized iPhone 5 models apparently don’t have the same status in the database as it is flagged as “ready to be unlocked” when purchased without a contract.

The iPhone 5 we tested was bought in an Apple retail store, but we couldn’t confirm this with another, pre-ordered iPhone 5 — even though the device was purchased at full price, it was tied to an existing AT&T account during the pre-order process. The carrier clearly states on its website that you have to be either a former customer or a customer without contract obligations to be eligible to go through the entire process, fax included. It could be problematic as well if you bought your iPhone 5 directly from AT&T.

Chris Velazco contributed reporting.

 

Direct Link: http://techcrunch.com/2012/09/26/to-unlock-a-full-price-att-iphone-5-just-restore-it-in-itunes/

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

 

GIZMODO
by Jesus Diaz
September 12, 2012

 

 

We love dogs, but we love war dogs even more because apart from being loyal and cute, they can be absolutely badass. We are so obsessed with these awesome canines that we made a collection of the 30 best photos we could find all over the web. Enjoy.

 

 

BADASS: War dogs are not new. They used them in armies thousands of years ago. These are US Army paratrooper rescue dogs being trained in 1944.

U.S. Office of War Information photo

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CUTE: Some start like this, as cute puppies in the Military Working Dog Breeding Program on Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio.

DoD photo by Linda Hosek

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BADASS: This is Rambo, an explosive detector dog assigned to the U.S. Air Force 447th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron chomping on a soldier for training.

U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo

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BADASS: Dog and US Army Special Forces soldier jump to the sea off the back of a CH-47 Chinook helicopter.

U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez

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CUTE: “I’m so happy!”—these dogs are trained with positive reinforcement conditioning techniques. They truly love it.

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Robert Storm

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CUTE: Two buddies resting. Explosive hunter dog Troy and U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Derrick Magee on a patrol break in Afghanistan.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Robert Storm

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BADASS: First military dog-human tandem airborne jump from 12,500 feet.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Vince Vander Maarel

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BADASS: Parachute opens!

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Vince Vander Maarel

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CUTE: You take your dog around the block. Senior Airman Stephen Hanks takes Geri around Sather Air Base’s perimeter, where he pees on tanks’ threads.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo

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CUTE: Staff Sgt. Erick Martinez carries Argo III over his shoulder. It’s an exercise to build trust and loyalty between them.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Allen Stokes

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CUTE: Apparently, being carried makes dogs very happy. This is Reyana on Senior Airman Beaun Clegg’s back.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Gina Chiaverotti-Paige

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CUTE: Not all war dogs are German shepherds. Here’s eight-year-old explosives sniffer Springer after a helo ride.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

Image by John Moore/Getty Images

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BADASS: Dogs wear goggles too to protect their eyes. They actually call them doggles. Seriously, that’s the actual name. The dog’s name is Rico.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Elizabeth Rissmiller

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BADASS: More doggles action, because there’s never enough doggles action. Ajax doesn’t seem to mind them.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Army photo/Pfc. William Servinski II

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CUTE: This is Panzer and US Army veteran Brad Schwarz, who suffers from post traumatic stress disorder. Panzer is not a war dog, but a service dog who helps war veterans.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

Image by Scott Olson/Getty Images

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BADASS: War dogs like to jump through car windows, just because they can.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Stacia M. Willis

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BADASS: Rangers and a multi-purpose war dog being awesome in the dark.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Army photo

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CUTE: Mack and Senior Airman Gregory Darby. Just bonding.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt Stan Parker

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CUTE: War dogs love tennis balls. This is Coba, a 3-year-old chocolate lab and tactical explosives detector dog.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Christopher M. Gaylord

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BADASS: Meki hoisted up to a medical evacuation helicopter in Alaska. War dogs are treated just like their human buddies.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew T MacRoberts

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BADASS: War dogs even give blood to save their fellow canines. Here’s Carly M745, a security forces K-9 being sedated to have blood drawn on July 3.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

US Army photo by Tech. Sgt. Caycee Cook

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SAD: War dogs die too. Rony was a patrol dog for President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden before dying on March 8, 2012.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Vanessa Valentine

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CUTE: Liaka, a Dutch shepherd, quietly receiving instructions from her handler on a mission in Hadar, Baghdad.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Todd Frantom

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CUTE: Search and rescue dog Ronnie high-fiving U.S. Air Force Capt. Greg Auerbach, an KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft instructor pilot with the 54th Air Refueling Squadron.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

DoD photo by Senior Airman Leandra D. Stepp, U.S. Air Force

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CUTE: Two airedale terriers, one wearing a special gas mask and the other carrying rations for a wounded soldier in World War II

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be

Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

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BADASS: When they are done with their mission, war dogs need to extracted too. Here are some Navy SEALs demonstrating a Special Patrol Insertion/Extraction with one of their dogs.

26 Awesome Photos of War Dogs Showing How Badass and Cute They Can Be U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Anthony Harding

Image research by Attila Nagy

 

 

Direct Link:  http://gizmodo.com/5943301/26-awesome-photos-of-war-dogs-showing-how-badass-and-cute-they-can-be